Parts Of India And Nepal Prepare For Marriage In The Most Colorful Way

Published August 23, 2015
Updated February 1, 2018

We rounded up the best photos from the Hindu Teej festival, where people gather to celebrate Parvati and Shiva.

In many parts of the United States, brides-to-be consult stale bridal magazines or the Internet in order to ensure the success of their future marriage. In parts of India, however, for three days women seeking marital bliss will fill the streets in vibrant fanfare.

Earlier this week, lively processions soaked towns and cities primarily in Nepal and northern India in rich hues to celebrate the Teej Festival, which pays tribute to both female devotion and the end of a hot, dry summer.

The exuberant festival draws residents and tourists from all over the world – particularly women, who gather to commemorate the reunion of Lord Shiva with Goddess Parvati, who fasted for over a century to prove her love of Shiva. The thought is that if observers seek blessings from Parvati on this special day – when Parvati was reunited with Shiva – they might enjoy a happy married life and a husband like Shiva.

In Jaipur, participants parade the Goddess Parvati throughout the streets and festoon themselves in ornate garb to pay tribute to her perseverance and virtue. Folk dancers, royal guards and heavily decorated elephants and camels trail behind the observers, transforming the streets into a massive parade-like celebration. Beyond prayer, women participate by decorating their hands with intricate mehndi or henna. A combination of fasting and over-the-top, sumptuous feasts often dictates the festival’s events.

The event – which is best experienced in the historic capital city of Jaipur – occurs sometime in the months of July and August, depending on the moon cycle. If you couldn’t make it, relive the marriage madness in these photos:

Teej Festival Goddess Parvati
Happiness
Teej Procession In India
Teej Festival In Jaipur
Parts Of India And Nepal Prepare For Marriage In The Most Colorful Way
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As these two videos show, you never know who (or what) you'll run into during the Teej procession:

Women often celebrate the Teej festival by getting incredibly detailed henna tattoos. Check out this mehndi tattooer in action:

Kiri Picone
Bay Area transplant Kiri Picone is a writer and marketer who loves bizarre news and the color purple.
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