What We Love This Week, Volume XCII

Published October 17, 2014
Updated October 15, 2014
Published October 17, 2014
Updated October 15, 2014
Pinnacles

Source: Bored Panda

Man Travels Thousands Of Miles Around Australia, Returns With These Stunning Scenes

Milky Way Uluru

Source: Bored Panda

Johan Lolos spent an entire year traversing Australia’s diverse terrains, documenting all of his findings on film. In spite–or perhaps because–of the danger to which he subjected himself daily, we think Lolos made the right choice in abandoning his Belgian homeland and entering the Outback. Lolos’ photos present a world that seems external to our own, but are made that much more exciting because–guess what–these places are right here on Earth. Check out the entire spread at Bored Panda.

Uluru Sunset

Source: Bored Panda

Latvian Cyclists Highlight The Absurdity Of Car Size

Latvia Cyclists Line

Source: Web Urbanist

While rising gas prices have caused cars to shed some of their weight in recent years, improved efficiency seems marginal when compared to the size of a bicycle. A group of Latvians chose to highlight the absurdly high amount of space that cars–often holding one passenger–occupy on International No Car Day this past September. The large, ridiculous looking structures are meant to ask the following question: just how much space does one person really need? Do privacy’s costs–in the form of increased travel time, congestion and air pollution–outweigh the benefits that driving a car affords you? Learn more about the movement at Web Urbanist.

Latvia Cyclists Behind

Source: Web Urbanist

Latvia Cyclists Suit

Source: Web Urbanist

Explore Harlem Through The Work Of One Incredibly Talented Street Photographer

For over two years now, 29-year-old filmmaker Khalik Allah has been building relationships with Harlem’s 125th and Lexington’s regulars through photo. Allowing strangers to photograph you is no easy feat, as portraits tend to be successful if the photographer and subject feel comfortable around–and trust–one another. That’s why, when Allah meets potential subjects, he shows them his past work. He also tells them that his camera is a healing mechanism. It’s worked, and his photos reveal a certain vulnerability–and resilience–of some of New York’s most stony-faced residents. See more at Time Lightbox.