Snarkitecture’s “Beach” Is Taking Over Washington D.C.

Published July 17, 2015
Updated September 14, 2021

Brooklyn-based design firm Snarkitecture just installed the world's most bizarre "beach." And you can visit it.

Sharkitecture

Forget sand and seawater. The architects and artists at Snarkitecture have created a beach that’s unlike anything you’ve ever seen. Using nearly one million white plastic balls, the studio installed a 10,000 square ball pit smack dab in the middle of the National Building Museum’s grand hall in Washington D.C. As if its sheer size wasn’t impressive enough, the installation’s monochromatic white on white color palette makes “The Beach” simply unforgettable.

Snarkitecture The Beach Installation

Source: Domus

“The Beach” was created to encourage people to interact with their surroundings in a fun (yet unexpected) way. But you don’t have to wade through the pit of recyclable plastic balls to enjoy all that this “beach” has to offer.

Snarkitecture also created a 50-foot “shoreline” that’s stocked with beach essentials like crisp white lounge chairs and umbrellas — and there’s even a nearby snack shop.

A mirror sits directly across from the shoreline, transforming the sea of white into an endless image. The massive ball pit will be open through September 7, but if you won’t be visiting D.C., let this video give you a taste of what the installation is like:

The Beach Shoreline

The “Shoreline.” Source: This is Colossal

Snarkitecture The Beach Incredible Collaboration with COS for Milan Design Week 2015. Source: VR Design Magazine[/caption]

Print All Over Me

Collaboration with Print All Over Me. Source: Architect Magazine

Snarkitecture In Washington DC

AIRBALL. Source: Huffington Post

The Beach Installation

Drift (2012). Source: Dazed Digital

Kiri Picone
Kiri Picone holds a B.A. in English and creative writing from Pepperdine University and has been writing for various digital publishers for more than 10 years.
Kiri Picone
Kiri Picone holds a B.A. in English and creative writing from Pepperdine University and has been writing for various digital publishers for more than 10 years.