This Week In History News, Apr. 14 – 20

Published April 19, 2019
Published April 19, 2019

Roman-era human sacrifice victims uncovered, stunning artwork found inside Ancient Egyptian tomb, liquid blood extracted from prehistoric horse specimen.

Workers Laying Pipe In Britain Discover Grisly Remains Of Roman-Era Human Sacrifice Victims

Human Sacrifice Victim With Feet Removed

Thames WaterOne of the victims, a woman, had her feet cut off and was buried with her hands tied behind her back.

When engineers in Oxfordshire, England were tasked with the routine laying of water pipes, they probably didn’t expect to discover a nearly 3,000-year-old settlement, Iron Age and Roman-era tools — and dozens of Neolithic skeletons.

The remains of 26 people were found at the site, many of which were likely victims of ritualistic human sacrifice. One of the victims had their skull placed by their feet. Another, a woman, had her feet cut off and her arms tied behind her back.

Dig deeper here.

Archeologists Discover Incredible Artwork Inside 4,300-Year-Old Egyptian Tomb

A team of archeologists in Egypt recently unveiled a well-preserved tomb featuring meticulous artwork that adorns its walls dating back to more than 4,000 years ago.

Experts believe that the tomb belonged to an ancient Egyptian nobleman named Khuwy. As the ancient artifacts inside the tomb showed, it was likely that Khuwy was an important figure during the Fifth Dynasty.

See more in this report.

Scientists Extract Blood And Urine From Perfectly Preserved 42,000-Year-Old Foal Found In Siberia

Siberian Foal

Semyon Grigoryev/NEFU/The Siberian TimesThe Ice Age foal being analyzed by scientists from the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation.

Seven months ago, researchers uncovered a 42,000-year-old foal found perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost. That discovery was stunning enough, but Russian and South Korean scientists have now extracted liquid blood from the prehistoric specimen.

Read on here.

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