The World’s 7 Ugliest Animals

Published January 5, 2014
Updated December 1, 2017

Ugliest Animals: The Blobfish

The blobfish got its name from, well, looking more like a blob than a fish. This ugly ocean dweller lives in deep waters off the coasts of Australia and surrounding areas. Since the blobfish’s body is made up of a gelatinous substance that’s slightly less dense than water, the fish is able to float above the sea floor without using much energy.

In 2013, the blobfish was formally named the “World’s Ugliest Animal” by the Ugly Animal Preservation Society. In the wild, the blobfish feeds by opening its mouth, floating and simply swallowing edible matter like crabs and sea pens that float nearby. Though rarely seen by humans, the blobfish is now facing extinction due to deep sea fishing.

Ugliest Animals Blobfish Up Close

Source: 24 Heures

Ugliest Animals Dead Blobfish

Source: iAnimal

Ugliest Animals: The Giant Water Bug

Ugliest Animals Water Bug

Source: Magick Canoe

While there are a number of unsightly bugs that probably could have made this list, the water bug is particularly unpleasant looking, especially when it’s carrying its eggs. Giant water bugs, known as belostomatidae, are also referred to as toe-biters and alligator ticks. These massive water bugs can grow to nearly five inches long, and are one of the largest beetles in the world.

Ugliest Animals Giant Water Bug

Source: Wikipedia

Giant water bugs are carnivores that hunt and feast on fish, crustaceans and amphibians. These giant bugs are known to chomp on unsuspecting humans (hence the “toe biter” moniker) and have one of the most painful bites of all insects. Many photos show male water bugs carrying their eggs upon their wings, which is why many consider these bugs pretty hands-on parents. Preferring their taste to their appearance, in some countries giant water bugs are considered a delicacy.

Ugliest Animals Giant Water Bug

Source: Flickr

Ugliest Animals Water Bug Attacking Frog

Source: Flickr

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