What We Love This Week, Volume XV

Published May 31, 2013
Updated September 1, 2017
Published May 31, 2013
Updated September 1, 2017
War Toys 1

Source: Hi Fructose

Brian McCarty’s “War Toys”

War Toys 3

Source: Hi Fructose

While war may destroy nations, political ideologies and even historic monuments, perhaps the most tragic casualty is the imagination and innocence stolen from a child caught in its throes. In light of this, world renown photographer Brian McCarty has taken to several Middle Eastern cities devastated by war and talked to some of the very children stricken by it. In their conversations, McCarty asks the children to express their memories through pencil and paper, which eventually serves as the framework for McCarty’s subsequent photos.

In them, war toys take on a much more sinister and macabre appearance, thus begging the question of why we try to plasticize, market and misrepresent war and its accompanying violence to children. If you want more, Hi Fructose has a great gallery of other images in McCarty’s series for your viewing pleasure.

War Toys 2

Source: Hi Fructose

Kevin Richardson, Lion Whisperer

For most, the largest feline anyone will cuddle with is their grandma’s 20-pounds overweight tabby. For zoologist and self-taught animal behavioralist Kevin Richardson, however, it’s a lion. Fascinated by wildlife since his childhood, Richardson’s incredibly intimate relations with the kings of the jungle mystifies even the experts.

As stated in his biography, Richardson “does not use common methods of breaking the animal’s spirit with sticks and chains, instead he uses love, understanding and trust. With this unusual method of training he has developed some exceptionally personal bonds with his students.” For more glimpses into Richardson’s feline friendships, head over to My Modern Met.

Awesome Site-Specific Wheatpastes In France

A major complaint cited regarding art is that it’s simply not made for public consumption and that, on the rare case that it is, art has little relationship with or understanding of its surroundings. But in street artist Lavalet’s wheat pastes, negates the two critiques in one fell swoop. Utilizing various rues throughout France, Lavalet creates fun, easily understood public portraits whose essence hinges upon the wall on which they’re placed.

All That's Interesting
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