What We Love This Week, Volume IX

Published April 19, 2013
Updated September 1, 2017
Published April 19, 2013
Updated September 1, 2017
Hair Wars 2

Source: Hi-Fructose

Peter Hapak’s Art Of Hair

Hair Wars 1

Source: Hi-Fructose

It was Joan Crawford who said that, next to talent, the most important thing a woman can have is her hairdresser. Crawford’s words did an excellent job at portraying the incredible demands of women in Hollywood–both physically and mentally–at the time; and in the case of Detroit’s “Hump the Grinder Hair Wars”, an African American hair show, the same could be said today. Photographed by Peter Hapak for Time, the colossal coiffes above and below constitute a 25-year tradition in the Motor City. These styles are no small feat; some of them take upwards of ten hours to complete. To check out more daring hairdos, visit Hi-Fructose.

Hair Wars 3

Source: Hi-Fructose

Photography Brings A New World To Child With Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular Dystrophy 1

Source: PetaPixel

This week has certainly been a rough one for many reasons, and if you’re seeking a sign that something truly beautiful can come from a situation easily definable as hopeless, look no further than this photo series. Upon talking to Luka, a 12-year-old suffering from muscular dystrophy, Slovenian photographer Matej Peljhan decided to give the boy physical mobility not with physical therapy but rather photography. Able to move little more than his fingers, Luka relayed his desire to walk and explore to Peljhan, and through art he actualized Luka’s wishes where Luka’s own body could not. Using every day objects to create fun, whimsical scenes, Peljhan reminds us that art does not only provide escapism from reality; it also grants us the opportunity to participate in a physical reality otherwise inaccessible to many. For the full gallery, head over to PetaPixel.

Muscular Dystrophy 2

Source: PetaPixel

Muscular Dystrophy 3

Source: PetaPixel

The Portal Within

You pass an old man on the street who is overly dressed for the early morning springtime chill. But beneath those beige and brown layers, what dynamic thoughts and dreams might he be concealing? Would they correspond with your own assumptions? Paris-dwelling Spanish photographer Nacho Ormaechea analyzes just that in his visual portal silhouette series. By establishing such jarring juxtaposition in each shot, Ormaechea entices the reader to consider the multiple worlds and identities streaming through the body and spirit of the average pedestrian. If you’re seeking more interior insights, This Is Colossal is where you need to head.

All That's Interesting
Your curiosity knows no bounds. Neither do we.