What We Love This Week, Volume XXIII

Published July 25, 2013
Updated September 1, 2017
Published July 25, 2013
Updated September 1, 2017

Dubai’s Gorgeous Urban Landscapes

Never underestimate the lengths to which some photographers will go to get the perfect shot. In the more literal sense, Russian photographer Vadim Makhorov has scaled the 418-feet tall pyramids of Giza (unaided and without the authority of the armed guards below) to capture their sultry surroundings, and this past spring, Makhorov ascended into the heavens to create his incredible 60-photo series of Dubai’s urban landscapes. Home to some of the tallest and most futuristic-looking buildings in the world, Makhorov was not without a staggering backdrop–the problem resided only in finding the vantage point that would do the city justice.

Next week, Makhorov kicks off his Europe trip in Stockholm, and you can follow his high-octane travels in Makhorov’s blog, featured here. In the meantime, be sure to check out some more of Dubai’s stunning specs at Twisted Sifter and try not to get dizzy.

Past Meets Present In Budapest

Overlay Photos 1

Source: Mashable

When looking at old photographs, particularly those in black and white, it’s easy to feel as if you are glimpsing into a world wholly removed and distinct from the present; that in your hands you hold a light and shadow-based slice of history that cannot be revived or translated into the modern world. Intrigued by antique photos of Budapest and overcoming the barriers that come along with them, Hungarian artist and architect Kerényi Zoltán convened the past with the present in his series titled “Ablak a Múltra,” or “Window to the Past”. Canvassing Andrássy Avenue to the wide sidewalks draped along the Danube, Kerényi seamlessly blends tangible memory with the physical present, and the result is truly amazing. To see more of Kerényi’s digital time travel, head over to Mashable.

Overlay Photos 2

Source: Mashable

Overlay Photos 3

Source: Mashable

Flying Flora: Incredible Birds Made Of Flower Petals

Malaysian artist Red Hong Yi recently made waves in the art world when she shed the traditional canvas for a ceramic plate and swapped acrylic paints for jelly beans, pasta and broccoli in her food art series. Now adding flowers and plants to her tool kit, Yi’s latest, kind-of-but-not-so “green” project centers around the creation of artistic avian scenes via herbs, twigs, and just about anything else in your grandmother’s garden. The result is modern yet whimsical, and yes, as Yi is in touch with the 21st century, she uploads all of her work to Instagram. For more when-flora-meets-fauna goodness, be sure to check out This Is Colossal’s spread.

All That's Interesting
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