Useless Products That Are Frustratingly Funny

Published October 20, 2014
Updated October 27, 2014

Sometimes the Invisible Hand messes up and brings items to market that hinder us more than they do help us. They don’t work appropriately, or they’re difficult to use. However, we probably haven’t experienced true dissatisfaction and anger until imagining trying to use these very badly-albeit humorously- designed products. Some people just want to set the world on fire to watch it burn.

Useless Products Boots
Knowing the fashion trends -and how they often spawn accessories so ugly and impractical that no one wants to wear them, these are right on target! Unfortunately, catching this would-be trend will also catch you a dandy cold. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Bowl
Bowls equipped with drainage holes are not - nor have they ever been - an intelligent design. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Fork
Good luck picking anything up with this redesign of a common utensil. Whoever can manage to successfully insert food into their face via this fork should receive a dexterity award. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Key
Sure, you can insert this key into the door to your dreams, but turning it is a feat that may never be accomplished. We wish you luck, young traveler. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Plate
We all know that person who manages to find the tiniest hair on their plate of food. Serve them their tacos on this plate, and watch them go ballistic before your very eyes. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Pot
We propose a new Olympic sport, wherein you carry this pot filled to the brim with boiling water for 500 meters. Whoever finishes with the least amount of third degree burns wins. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Pot
This one isn’t so bad; at least you can actually carry water or other liquids in this. Just don’t try and pour anything from it. That wouldn’t end well. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Red Chair
As students, we probably all felt that the chairs used in schools were directly inspired by this design. All it’s missing is the one leg that’s just a tad shorter, and then you can do that rocking motion that drives all the other students batty. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Salt And Pepper
This will make sure your salt and pepper pass through the sands of time before landing on your potatoes. It tastes even better when you have to wait for it, right? Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Santa Hat
There isn’t a whole lot to be said here. This jolly Santa hat is on your head one second, and crushing that little elf’s toe the next. Repeat. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Spoon
With all of the other badly designed products, you could at least find some way around the bad design. We can’t think of a single way to efficiently use this spoon, so we bid the designer to come hither so we can stick it in their eye. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Umbrella
Harkening back to the times of Fred Flintstone… it may keep the rain at bay, but your back will surely pay. Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Watering Can
Create your own watering can paradox! It just keeps watering and watering and watering and watering… Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products White Chair
Which would be more comfortable: this chair, or the red chair earlier in the list? Source: Twisted Sifter

Useless Products Wine Glass
There are some pretty fancy wine glasses out there, and this one looks cool, but its functionality probably won’t rank very high unless your mouth has switched places with your nose. Source: Twisted Sifter

Erin Kelly
An All That's Interesting writer since 2013, Erin Kelly focuses on historic places, natural wonders, environmental issues, and the world of science. Her work has also been featured in Smithsonian and she's designed several book covers in her career as a graphic artist.
Savannah Cox
Savannah Cox holds a Master's in International Affairs from The New School as well as a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and now serves as an Assistant Professor at the University of Sheffield. Her work as a writer has also appeared on DNAinfo.